Triclosan Trickle Effect: An Anti-Bacterial Pesticide

When ‘Anti-Bacterial’ soaps came on the market, the additional ingredient was triclosan. It was first created for hospital use but quickly spread to the mass market for use in:

 

  • antibacterial soaps and shampoos (Dial, Softsoap, Clerasil…)
  • skin cleansing wipes (SaniCart)
  • toothpaste (Colgate Total…)
  • deodorants (Old Spice, Right Guard…)
  • shaving gels (Gilette…)
  • childrens toys (Playskool…)
  • brake fluids (STP, Valvoline, Penzzoil…)
  • antibacterial socks (Fruit of the Loom, Dickies…)

 

On top of those, triclosan and tricoloban hides in some refrigerators, dishwasher fluids, chopping boards, and plastic lunch boxes. It can be found sprinkled on many products we use regularly. What is the triclosan trickle effect on us? It has been referred to as an ‘anti-bacterial pesticide.’

Studies have increasingly linked triclosan (and its chemical cousin triclocarban), to a range of adverse health effects from skin irritation, endocrine disruption, gut issues, and even cancer. Environmental effects include the contamination of water and its negative impact on fragile aquatic ecosystems.

There have been active bans of the ingredient around the world. However, at this time, the FDA hasn’t seen any studies that prove it’s dangerous for human use. In 2011, Proctor & Gamble announced it would remove triclosan from all it’s products by 2014. The ingredient is now banned in Canada, in the state of Minnesota and in the EU since 2010.

The most serious effect is it’s ability to make us antibiotic resistant. I hear questions about triclosan asked at dental conferences to the dental reps. We all want to be educated about this ingredient that could have adverse health risks. Please share what you believe and know to be true.

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